Kentucky Student Killed In Seoul Crowd Surge 'She Was A Bright Light'

Kentucky Student Killed In Seoul Crowd Surge: ‘She Was A Bright Light’

The University of Kentucky is grieving the loss of Anne Gieske, a student. She was killed in Seoul, South Korea, on Saturday, October 29, during a risky crowd surge during Halloween celebrations.

The University of Kentucky community is mourning the awful loss of one of our students, Anne Gieske, who was studying abroad in Seoul, South Korea, and was killed in this weekend’s tragedy, according to a statement posted in a multi-tweet thread on Twitter on Sunday, October 30.

 The statement read, “We have been in contact with her family and will offer any help we can — now and in the days ahead — as they adjust to this terrible loss. All individuals in our community who knew and loved her will have our support.

In a separate tweet, the University of Kentucky shared a phone number for students to call if they needed to speak with a mental health professional after hours, in addition to links to resources that are accessible to students.

Eli Capilouto, the university’s president, also posted a statement to the campus community on the school’s website. Before going into more detail about the event that claimed the lives of more than 150 people, Capilouto wrote, “I have the unfortunate responsibility to inform you of the loss of one of our pupils over the weekend.”

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Gieske, a native of Northern Kentucky, was a nursing major in her junior year of college and spent the fall 2022 semester studying abroad in South Korea, according to Capilouto. This semester, the University of Kentucky sent a faculty member and two additional students to South Korea, but all three were contacted and were judged safe.

Capilouto concluded his message by writing, “As a community, it is a sacred responsibility we must keep – to be there for one other in moments of utter delight and those of greatest despair.” Communities with compassion act in this manner. And I know that’s what we are right now and for the foreseeable future.

On behalf of the family, Gieske’s father, Dan, told NBC News on Sunday: “We are shocked and grieved by the loss of Anne Marie. She was a shining star that everyone adored. In addition to your prayers, please respect our right to privacy.

According to authorities, a deadly crowd rush erupted in a well-known nightlife area of Seoul around 10:15 p.m. local time, resulting in at least 153 fatalities, including two Americans, and 103 injuries. Of those hurt, 23 were in critical condition, while 79 had less severe wounds.

According to the Yongsan fire department, other foreign victims of the tragedy were from Austria, China, France, Iran, Kazakhstan, Norway, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Uzbekistan. Around 100,000 people are thought to have gathered in the Itaewon district on Saturday, October 30, to celebrate Halloween.

Although more videos showed what seemed to be a crowd surge as people attempted to push past a dense crowd in a small alley, the incident was initially labelled as a stampede. On behalf of the family, Gieske’s father, Dan, told NBC News on Sunday: “We are shocked and grieved by the loss of Anne Marie. She was a shining star that everyone adored. In addition to your prayers, please respect our right to privacy.

According to authorities, a deadly crowd rush erupted in a well-known nightlife area of Seoul around 10:15 p.m. local time resulting in at least 153 fatalities, including two Americans, and 103 injuries. Of those hurt, 23 were in critical condition, while 79 had less severe wounds.

According to the Yongsan fire department, other foreign victims of the tragedy were from Austria, China, France, Iran, Kazakhstan, Norway, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Uzbekistan.

Around 100,000 people are thought to have gathered in the Itaewon district on Saturday, October 30, to celebrate Halloween. Although more videos showed what seemed to be a crowd surge as people attempted to push past a dense crowd in a small alley, the incident was initially labelled as a stampede.

There were more Americans who died in the disaster besides Gieske. The other American fatality reported was 20-year-old Steven Blesi from Marietta, Georgia. His father, Steve Blesi, confirmed his passing TODAY and stated that his son was in South Korea for the autumn semester to study international business and learn the Korean language.