New Cases Are Added To The Virginia Cold Case Database

New Cases Are Added To The Virginia Cold Case Database

The Virginia State Police’s cold case database has expanded over the months since it was first established, providing renewed hope to individuals affected by unresolved crimes and disappearances around the state.

A searchable database of details, photographs, and contact details related to unsolved killings, unidentified persons, and missing person cases that have persisted for at least five years inside the state is available on the internet that is open to the public. The Virginia State Police and local law enforcement organizations can add information to the database.

They launched The website in June of this year with a small selection of Virginia State Police cases. Since then, information from around 60 unsolved killings, missing person cases, and unidentified points from a total of 12 Virginia agencies have been added to the website. 19 local police and sheriff’s departments across Virginia have also received training and online access from state police.

 

Colonel Gary T. Settle, superintendent of the Virginia State Police, claims that despite the database’s name, the phrase “cold case” is inaccurate regarding how law enforcement approaches cases that go unresolved for an extended period.

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Settle asserted, “There is no such thing as a cold case. “That appellation is misleading because a murder, a missing person inquiry, or an unidentified person case never actually goes cold, regardless of how much time has passed. Virginia law enforcement agencies keep looking into unresolved issues until the victim and their families receive justice.

Unfortunately, it often takes longer in some situations than others to make an arrest and bring a case to an end. Settle anticipates that more actions will be taken in Virginia to finally settle these unsolved cases due to the database’s development as a tool.

Every unresolved case now has global exposure thanks to this website, and Settle expressed hope that it would lead to fresh tips, and high-caliber leads that Virginia’s law enforcement authorities might follow up on.